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Measurement and automation

                                           

The Artificial Intelligence (AI) faculty in Toronto works in several  primary sub-areas of the field—computational linguistics, knowledge  representation and reasoning, robotics, planning, computer vision and  machine learning/neural networks. We have 14 full-time faculty members  whose research spans these areas and more, and offer over a dozen  graduate courses to help students develop and expand their knowledge and expertise.        

                                   



Computational linguistics

The sub-area of AI concerned with human languages (“natural languages”)  is computational linguistics. Researchers in this area are interested in developing programs that can “understand” and generate natural  language. “Understanding” involves parsing linguistic input, determining its literal and non-literal meaning and representing the meaning in a  computational formalism; generation reverses this process. Research in  this area is now being applied in commercial systems for tasks such as  automatic or semi-automatic translation from one language to another        



Machine Learning

The sub-area of AI concerned with human languages (“natural languages”)  is computational linguistics. Researchers in this area are interested in developing programs that can “understand” and generate natural  language. “Understanding” involves parsing linguistic input, determining its literal and non-literal meaning and representing the meaning in a  computational formalism; generation reverses this process. Research in  this area is now being applied in commercial systems for tasks such as  automatic or semi-automatic        



Computational linguistics

The sub-area of AI concerned with human languages (“natural languages”)  is computational linguistics. Researchers in this area are interested in developing programs that can “understand” and generate natural  language. “Understanding” involves parsing linguistic input, determining its literal and non-literal meaning and representing the meaning in a  computational formalism; generation reverses this process. Research in  this area is now being applied in commercial systems for tasks such as  automatic or semi-automatic        



Machine Learning

The sub-area of AI concerned with human languages (“natural languages”)  is computational linguistics. Researchers in this area are interested in developing programs that can “understand” and generate natural  language. “Understanding” involves parsing linguistic input, determining its literal and non-literal meaning